TALK THE TOT ™

A campaign to spread the word about the critical importance of supporting babies, toddlers, and their families to foster children’s healthy development.

More than 1,000,000 new neural connections form every second in a child’s first few years of life.

The first three years of a child’s life are a period of rapid brain development. Meaning that the experiences of babies and toddlers have an enormous impact on their brain’s architecture — the foundation for all future learning, behavior and health. Yet, too often, families with young children are disconnected from or can’t access the supports that would help them optimize their child’s healthy growth and development.1

TAKE THE PLEDGE

Show your commitment to improving support for babies, toddlers, and their families.

Join us in a social media campaign to Talk the Tot and spread the word about early childhood development and the importance of supporting babies, toddlers, and their families. We all have a role to play in ensuring our children have the best possible beginnings in life. Help us start the conversation.

Join our pledge signers below

   Nima, Adrienne on behalf of Avery, Michelle, Michele, Lois, Heather on behalf of children in her community, Sarah, Alison, Margaret, Erika on behalf of Shiloh, Karen, Josefina, Bonnie on behalf of Nathan, Erica, Amber, Wendy, Maria, September, Andrea, Susan, Evelyn on behalf of Steven, Carolyn.

WHAT IT ENTAILS

1

LEARN

Use our toolkit to share facts about early childhood development

2

SHARE

Share your stories about your child’s development, key milestones, support that has helped you as a parent, or how you’ve supported parents of young children.

3

JOIN US

Let our state’s leaders know California must do better in supporting families with young children.

PHASE 3, WEEK 5

Click here for past posts.

Week 5 – 11/18 to 11/22

11/18/19

Did you know that in California, although half of pregnant women report a dental problem, only 42% visited a dentist during their pregnancy? Unfortunately, the state does not collect data on pregnant women who are enrolled in Medi-Cal and receive dental services .

As a result, we don’t have a true understanding of who is receiving these services and are unable to determine if there are any issues related to access. Read our new blog post to learn more! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/19/19

Thankfully, access to oral health care for pregnant women is improving. In fact, several local oral health programs are convening OB/GYNs and dental providers to address commonly held myths about women who are pregnant receiving dental care. Read more about it here! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/20/19

Even though we’re making progress, the state can do more to ensure ALL pregnant women are receive the oral health care they need. One thing the state can improve is the data collection on pregnant women enrolled in Medi-Cal. This way, we can identify and eliminate barriers and ensure equitable access to oral health care. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/21/19

What else can our state do to make sure all women who are pregnant receive the oral health care they need? Have a stronger integration and collaboration among medical and dental providers, which can help to address and bridge any divides that may exist. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/22/19

In an ideal California, all children will reach the age of three being cavity free, based in large part on their mothers having established good oral health hygiene habits during pregnancy, and understanding the importance of preventive services for themselves and their children as they grow. This can only be possible, however, if the state commits to investing in current oral health programs and services, so that they are available to all babies, children and families that need them. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/18/19

Did you know that in California, although half of pregnant women report a dental problem, only 42% visited a dentist during their pregnancy? Unfortunately, the state does not collect data on pregnant women who are enrolled in Medi-Cal and receive dental services .

As a result, we don’t have a true understanding of who is receiving these services and are unable to determine if there are any issues related to access. Read our new blog post to learn more! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/19/19

Thankfully, access to oral health care for pregnant women is improving. In fact, several local oral health programs are convening OB/GYNs and dental providers to address commonly held myths about women who are pregnant receiving dental care. Read more about it here! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/20/19

Even though we’re making progress, the state can do more to ensure ALL pregnant women are receive the oral health care they need. One thing the state can improve is the data collection on pregnant women enrolled in Medi-Cal. This way, we can identify and eliminate barriers and ensure equitable access to oral health care. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/21/19

What else can our state do to make sure all women who are pregnant receive the oral health care they need? Have a stronger integration and collaboration among medical and dental providers, which can help to address and bridge any divides that may exist. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/22/19

In an ideal California, all children will reach the age of three being cavity free, based in large part on their mothers having established good oral health hygiene habits during pregnancy, and understanding the importance of preventive services for themselves and their children as they grow.

How can we achieve this?
This can only be possible if the state commits to investing in current oral health programs and services, so that they are available to all babies, children and families that need them. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/18/19

TWITTER THREAD

TW 1:
Did you know that in California, although half of pregnant women report a dental problem, only 42% visited a dentist during their pregnancy? Unfortunately, the state does not collect data on pregnant women who are enrolled in Medi-Cal and receive dental services. (2/3)

TW 2:
As a result, we don’t have a true understanding of who is receiving these services and aren’t able to determine if there are any issues related to access. Follow our link in bio to learn more! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/19/19

TWITTER THREAD

TW 1:
Thankfully, access to oral health care for pregnant women is improving. (1/2)

TW2:
In fact, several local oral health programs are convening OB/GYNs and dental providers to address commonly held myths about women who are pregnant receiving dental care. Read more about it here! #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp
(2/2)

 

11/20/19

TWITTER THREAD

TW 1:
Even though we’re making progress, the state can do more to ensure ALL pregnant women are receive the oral health care they need.

TW 2:
One thing the state can improve is the data collection on pregnant women enrolled in Medi-Cal. This way, we can identify and eliminate barriers and ensure equitable access to oral health care. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/21/19

What else can our state do to make sure all women who are pregnant receive the oral health care they need? Have a stronger integration and collaboration among medical and dental providers, which can help to address and bridge any divides that may exist. #TalktheTot https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

11/22/19

TWITTER THREAD

TW 1:
In an ideal California, all children will reach the age of three being cavity free, based in large part on their mothers having established good oral health hygiene habits during pregnancy, and understanding the importance of preventive services for themselves and their children as they grow.

TW 2:
How can we achieve this?
This can only be possible if the state commits to investing in current oral health programs and services, so that they are available to all babies, children and families that need them. https://bit.ly/35fcpGp

PAST POSTS

PHASE 3

Week 4 – 11/11 to 11/15

11/11/19

Smiling, grasping, crawling, these are all developmental milestones that babies work towards achieving. One very important way to monitor a baby’s development is through developmental screenings. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children under the age of three be screened routinely to monitor their development and identify potential delays Unfortunately, fewer than 1 in 3 babies and toddlers with Medi-Cal were receiving timely screenings in 2015. Read more here and stay tuned to learn more! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/12/19

This year, in response to the unacceptably low rates of developmental screenings for babies and toddlers, California approved the use of tobacco tax funds to reimburse Medi-Cal providers for developmental and trauma screenings. But more must be done! Find out more here #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/13/19

This year, the state has taken first steps toward improving developmental screening rates. Newly approved legislation, Assembly Bill 1004, will strengthen the current law and require California to use the developmental screenings data that is collected for compliance purposes. But more must be done! To learn more, follow the link. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/14/19

Starting in 2020, California will begin to publicly report on developmental screenings in Medi-Cal health plans. This will help us track progress in our state and see how we are doing compared to other states. In the meantime, you can check out this factsheet on the 2018 Child Core Set data, which shows that higher screening rates are possible. In fact, 11 states reported developmental screening rates of more than 50%. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/2019-health-quality-chart

11/15/19

We know developmental screenings are crucial to make sure babies and toddlers are receiving the supports they need to grow healthy, but more work needs to be done to ensure families receive referrals and have access to early intervention services following developmental screenings. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/11/19

Instagram Post (will be mentioned in our IG Stories):

Smiling, grasping, crawling, these are all developmental milestones that babies work towards achieving One very important way to monitor a baby’s development is through developmental screenings. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children under the age of three be screened routinely to monitor their development and identify potential delays. To learn more, follow the link in bio! #TalktheTot

Please participate in/share our Instagram stories:

IG Story 1: A baby’s brain develops incredibly fast in the first few years of life. Baby’s start developing their socio-emotional skills, language skills, and motor skills before they reach the age of 3 – True or False? Answer: True!

IG Story 2: One very important way to monitor a baby’s growth and development is through developmental screenings – True or False? Answer: True! And it’s the first step to identifying potential delays and connecting children with the supports they need.

IG Story 3: But in 2015 fewer than 1 in 3 infants and toddlers with Medi-Cal were receiving timely developmental screenings. And this is especially important considering half of young California kids are covered by Medi-Cal.

IG Story 4 [LINK TO IG POST]: Check out our blog to learn what California is doing to improve the number of kids receiving developmental screenings! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/12/19

This year, in response to the unacceptably low rates of developmental screenings for babies and toddlers, California approved the use of tobacco tax funds to reimburse Medi-Cal providers for developmental and trauma screenings. But more must be done! Find out more in the link in bio #TalktheTot

11/13/19

This year, the state has taken first steps toward improving developmental screening rates. Newly approved legislation, Assembly Bill 1004, will strengthen the current law and require California to use the developmental screenings data that is collected for compliance purposes. But more must be done! To learn more, follow the link. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/14/19

Instagram Post (will be mentioned in our IG Stories):

Starting in 2020, California will begin to publicly report on developmental screenings in Medi-Cal health plans. This will help us track progress in our state and see how we are doing compared to other states you can check out this factsheet on the2018 Child Core Set data, and which shows that higher screening rates are possible. In fact, 11 states reported developmental screening rates of more than 50%. #TalktheTot

IG Story 1:
Did you know that next year, CA will begin to publicly report on developmental screenings in Medi-Cal health plans?

IG Story 2 [LINK TO IG POST]:
In the meantime, check out this factsheet on the 2018 Child Core Set data, which shows that higher screening rates are possible. In fact, 11 states reported developmental screening rates of more than 50%. #TalktheTot

11/15/19

We know developmental screenings are crucial to make sure babies and toddlers are receiving the supports they need to grow healthy, but more work needs to be done to ensure families receive referrals and have access to early intervention services following developmental screenings. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/11/19

Please participate in/share our Twitter Poll and Thread:

TW Poll 1: A baby’s brain develops incredibly fast in the first few years of life. Babies start developing their socio-emotional skills, language skills, and motor skills before they reach the age of 3 – True or False? Answer: True!

TW Poll 2: One very important way to monitor a baby’s growth and development is through developmental screenings – True or False? Answer: True! And it’s the first step to identifying potential delays and connecting children with the supports they need.

TWITTER THREAD below:

TW 1: Even though developmental screenings are crucial, in 2015, fewer than 1 in 3 infants and toddlers with Medi-Cal were receiving timely developmental screenings. And this is especially important considering half of California’s young kids are covered by Medi-Cal.

TW 2: Check out our blog to learn what’s being done – and what more needs to be done – to improve the number of kids receiving developmental screenings! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/12/19

This year, in response to the unacceptably low rates of developmental screenings for babies and toddlers, California approved the use of tobacco tax funds to reimburse Medi-Cal providers for developmental and trauma screenings. But more must be done! Find out more here #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/13/19

This year, the state has taken first steps toward improving developmental screening rates. Newly approved legislation, Assembly Bill 1004, will strengthen the current law and require California to use the developmental screenings data that is collected for compliance purposes. But more must be done! To learn more, follow the link. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

11/14/19

TWITTER THREAD

TW 1:
Starting in 2020, California will begin to publicly report on developmental screenings in Medi-Cal health plans. This will help us track progress in our state and see how we are doing compared to other states. (1/2)

TW 2:
In the meantime, check out this factsheet on the2018 Child Core Set data, and which shows that higher screening rates are possible. In fact, 11 states reported developmental screening rates of more than 50%. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/2019-health-quality-chart
(2/2)

11/15/19

We know developmental screenings are crucial to make sure babies and toddlers are receiving the supports they need, but more work needs to be done to ensure families receive referrals and have access to early intervention services following developmental screenings. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/19-dev-screenings

Week 3 – 11/4 to 11/8

11/4/19

For new parents, the right support, at the right time, can make all the difference. This is why we’re taking a look at evidence-based home visiting programs this week. These programs match new and expectant parents with caring, trained professionals. In doing so, families receive individualized support during critical points in pregnancy and through a child’s first year(s) of life.

To learn more follow the link! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot

11/5/19

We know that the first three years of a child’s life are critical to nurture brain development. But during these years, families also experience high physical and emotional demands. This is where home visitors can help. Home visitors work with caregivers on a regular basis, often beginning during pregnancy and continuing for the next several years. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/7/19

Evidence-based home visiting boosts parents and children by supporting children’s health and learning, promoting healthy family relationships, promoting family economic self-sufficiency, and much more. Follow the link to hear what some parents say about this program! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/8/19

This year, Governor Newsom’s first budget included unprecedented investment in voluntary evidence-based home visiting. This investment will bring home visiting to an estimated 20,000 additional families in 44 counties. But we still have a way to go, since home visiting currently reaches only an around two percent of California families with babies and toddlers. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/4/19

For new parents, the right support, at the right time, can make all the difference. This is why we’re taking a look at evidence-based home visiting programs this week. These programs match new and expectant parents with caring, trained professionals. In doing so, families receive individualized support during critical points in pregnancy and through a child’s first year(s) of life.

To learn more follow the link! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot

11/5/19

We know that the first three years of a child’s life are critical to nurture brain development. But during these years, families also experience high physical and emotional demands. This is where home visitors can help. Home visitors work with caregivers on a regular basis, often beginning during pregnancy and continuing for the next several years. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/7/19

Evidence-based home visiting boosts parents and children by supporting children’s health and learning, promoting healthy family relationships, promoting family economic self-sufficiency, and much more. Follow the link to hear what some parents say about this program! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/8/19

This year, Governor Newsom’s first budget included unprecedented investment in voluntary evidence-based home visiting. This investment will bring home visiting to an estimated 20,000 additional families in 44 counties. But we still have a way to go, since home visiting currently reaches only an around two percent of California families with babies and toddlers. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/4/19

TWITTER THREAD

Tweet 1:
For new parents, the right support, at the right time, can make all the difference. This is why we’re taking a look at evidence-based home visiting programs this week. (1/2)

Tweet 2:
These programs match new and expectant parents with caring, trained professionals. In doing so, families receive individualized support during critical points in pregnancy and through a child’s first year(s) of life. To learn more follow the link! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot (2/2)

11/5/19

TWITTER THREAD

Tweet 1:
We know that the first three years of a child’s life are critical to nurture brain development. But during these years families also experience high physical and emotional demands. (1/2)

Tweet 2:
This is where home visitors can to help. Home visitors work with caregivers on a regular basis, often beginning during pregnancy and continuing for the next several years. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1 (2/2)

11/7/19

Evidence-based home visiting boosts parents and children by supporting children’s health and learning, promoting healthy family relationships, promoting family economic self-sufficiency, and much more. Follow the link to hear what some parents say about this program! #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1

11/8/19

TWITTER THREAD

Tweet 1:
This year, Governor Newsom’s first budget included unprecedented investment in voluntary evidence-based home visiting. This investment will bring home visiting to an estimated 20,000 additional families in 44 counties. (1/2)

Tweet 2:
But we still have a way to go, since home visiting currently reaches only an around two percent of California families with babies and toddlers. #TalktheTot https://go.childrennow.org/tot-hv-1 (2/2)

Week 2 – 10/28 to 11/1

Week 1 – 10/21 to 10/25

PHASE 2

10/9

What advice about caring for children has been the most helpful to you? Why?

10/7

What was most challenging about raising a baby and what support do families need? Parents, who helped you the most along the way (i.e. your parents, partner, friends, pediatrician, caregiver)?

10/2

Which developmental milestone that your babies and toddlers reached were you most excited about? What developmental milestone worried you the most?

9/30

Tell us about how you felt as your babies and toddlers developed and worked towards achieving their own developmental milestones. Were you excited? Anxious? Why or why not?

9/25

As you saw your babies and toddlers grow up, is there something you wished you would have known during this time?

9/23

What was it was like seeing your babies and toddlers grow up: What was unexpected? How did you feel/react?

PHASE 1

RESOURCES

Have a question?

Contact us at mmejia@childrennow.org

  1. https://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/key-concepts/brain-architecture/”>https://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/key-concepts/brain-architecture/