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Developmental Screening Infographic

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The Developmental and Behavioral Screening Infographic was developed and created by Children Now and the First Five Association of California.


List of Sources

A Healthy Beginning for Young California Kids: Universal Developmental & Behavioral Screenings

Identifying concerns and intervening early boosts child success and reduces health and education system costs 1

Nearly 85 percent of brain development happens in the first three years of life; Infants and toddlers rapidly grow and gain skills in many areas simultaneously: gross & fine motor’ cognitive & problem-solving; social & emotional; speech & language 2

Pediatricians recommend all children be screened routinely between birth and age three 3

Fewer than 1 in 3 [28.5%] young children in California receive timely developmental screenings 4

1 in 4 [28.1%] CA kids under age 6 are at moderate- or high-risk for developmental, behavioral, or social delays 5 , but…

California ranks 30th in the nation on the rate of infant & toddler developmental screenings 6

2 in 5 [40.7%] CA parents with children under age 6 report having concerns about their child’s physical, behavioral, or social development 7

Routine screenings of children’s development during a health care visit help guide referrals to the services children need, resulting in cost-effective care and better outcomes for kids 8

 

Sources

 

  1. For example, see First 5 SCALAR, “Promoting Healthy Child Development through Universal Screening, Early Intervention and Treatment of Children’s Mental Health and Developmental Needs” Issue Brief, no. 4 (October 2010); and Ounce of Prevention Fund, “Start Early To Build A Healthy Future: The Research Linking Early Learning and Health” (2014).

  2. For example, see Center on the Developing Child (2007). The Science of Early Childhood Development (InBrief). Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu.

  3. See American Academy of Pediatrics, “Identification and Evaluation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders,” Pediatrics 2007 120: 1183-1215, and S. Thomas, et al., “Comparison of Systematic Developmental Surveillance With Standardized Developmental Screening in Primary Care,” Clinical Pediatrics, February 2012 vol. 51 no. 2:154-159

  4. Indicator 4.16: Developmental screening during health care visit, age 10 months-5 years, National Survey of Children’s Health, NSCH 2011/12. Data query from the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health website. Retrieved [02/12/15] from www.childhealthdata.org.

  5. Indicator 2.2: At risk for developmental, behavioral, or social delays, age 4 months-5 years, National Survey of Children’s Health, NSCH 2011/12. Data query from the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health website. Retrieved [02/12/15] from www.childhealthdata.org.

  6. Indicator 4.16: Developmental screening during health care visit, age 10 months-5 years, National Survey of Children’s Health, NSCH 2011/12. Data query from the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health website. Retrieved [02/12/15] from www.childhealthdata.org.

  7. Indicator 2.1: How many children have parents with one or more concerns about child’s physical, behavioral or social development?, National Survey of Children’s Health, NSCH 2011/12. Data query from the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health website. Retrieved [04/01/15] from www.childhealthdata.org.

  8. For example, see U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Education, “Birth to Five: Watch Me Thrive! A Community Guide for Developmental and Behavioral Screening” (2014), and other resources at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/child-health-development/watch-me-thrive.